Newsletter
Your Email :
 subscribe    unsubscribe
 

  Calendar
« November 2017 »
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
      1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30    
 

  Social Network
  
 

  Links
 

  Statistics
 

  Clock
 

 Welcome to ISIS Thailand !

  Events View All>> 
There is not data.
  Articles View All>> 
 Event Summary 2018

Public Forum: Water Politics: The South China Sea and The Mekong Region (Youtube and NO Summary Report) 

The South China Sea has become an arena of geopolitical tensions, pitting Asean claimant states against China. The Philippines and Vietnam, in particular, have high stakes in the South China Sea, whereas China has built a string of artificial islands in the area. In addition, the Mekong region in mainland Southeast Asia is another arena of tensions arising from water resource utilization. China has built a string of upstream dams to the detriment of local communities and habits in downstream countries, particularly Cambodia and Vietnam. In both cases, regional and international governance frameworks have proved inadequate in addressing thorny issues and challenges. This public forum seeks to better understand stakeholder perspectives and to explore ways for constructive dialogue with mutually beneficial policy considerations. 
More>>

A "Dream Thailand" Public Forum: "The Future of Democracy: What It Means for China, the West and the Rest (Youtube and NO Summary Report) 

This lecture will be delivered by Professor Larry Diamond, who is a world-renowned expert in both theory and practice of comparative politics and democratization, based at Stanford University. Prof Diamond has written myriad books and articles on democracy, and has had policy experience in democracy promotion. He is the author of much of the literature concerning democratic “rollback/recession/reversal.” Few scholars and practitioners have tracked global democratization more than Prof Diamond. After his talk, we will hold a panel to examine democratization and authoritarianism in the context of Thailand and Southeast Asia, drawing on local expertise. This is a timely forum that benefits from Prof Diamond’s brief visit to Thailand. 
More>>

Public Forum: Rakhine’s Past, Myanmar’s Future: Beyond the Rohingya Crisis (a book launch and panel discussion) - [Youtube and NO Summary Report]] 

It will revolve around a launch of a new book, Myanmar’s ‘Rohingya’ Conflict, by Anthony Ware and Costas Laoutides. After a presentation laying out a summary and thesis of the book, we will have two prominent experts on Myanmar/Burma issues – Emeritus Professor Robert Taylor and Dr Tin Maung Maung Than – to tease out dynamics and prospects of the Rohingya crisis in particular and what lies ahead for Myanmar overall. ISIS Senior Fellow Gwen Robinson will moderate. 
More>>

Public Forum: Surin Pitsuwan and ASEAN: A Tribute - (Youtube and Summary Report) 

As you know, Dr Surin was a Thai Foreign Minister and statesman and later an ASEAN Secretary-General who put Southeast Asia’s regional organisation on the maps and in the minds of many in capitals around the world. Apart from being ASEAN’s tireless and charismatic spokesman, Dr Surin used his leadership skills and diplomatic acumen to come up with solutions and answers to many of Southeast Asia’s problems and challenges. His unfortunate and untimely passing on 30th November 2017 deprives the region of its most ardent and inspirational thinker, practitioner, spokesman, and leader. Accordingly, it is fitting that we remember Dr Surin for his many achievements and lasting results in favour and on behalf of ASEAN. 
More>>

Public Lecture: DEMOCRACY’S DISCONTENTS IN SOUTHEAST ASIA - Sound Recorded (No Youtube & Report)) 

Southeast Asia is well known for its diverse regime types, ranging from absolute monarchy in Brunei and military government in Thailand to communist-party rule in Laos and Vietnams, with varying shades of democracy and dictatorship in between. Some of these regimes hold regular elections but harbor authoritarian values and practices rather than democratic characteristics and behavior. Twenty years ago, prospects for democracy in Southeast Asia seemed bright as democratization made inroads in the region. But recent trends have witnessed a regression and retreat of democracy. This public lecture and ensuing discussion will aim to tease out and dissect the causes and consequences of Southeast Asia’s discontents with democracy. Dr Mark Thompson is a longtime and well-known expert on the subject, and he will share his research findings and insights with us. 
More>>

A "Dream Thailand" Public Forum: The Military in Thai Politics: Trends and Prospects (A Book Launch and Panel Discussion) - [Youtube & Summary Report 

Evidently, Thailand has had a military government since its latest coup in May 2014. The last time this happened was in 2006-07 following a similar putsch, but the military government at that time stayed in office for just 15 months, and left on time. Prior to 2006, Thailand had a military government for 13 months in 1991-92. Thus, over the past four decades, the current military government has been in power the longest. It also has further plans for Thai politics and appears intent to exert longer-term influence in the country. In this context, Dr Greg Raymond’s just-published Thai Military Power: A Culture of Strategic Accommodation is utterly timely, explaining the evolution and dynamics of the military’s role in Thai politics. We will launch Dr Raymond’s fine book at this public forum, starting with the author’s presentation of his research and findings, followed by a panel discussion as per the attached flyer. 
More>>

Public Forum: CHINA’ S WAY: BRI, AIIB, NDB, SCS, LMC, ETC - (Youtube and Summary Report) 

Amidst global power shift, China now looms large on the global stage. Its Belt and Road Initiative, Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank and New Development Bank have the potential to redraw the global economic landscape. China's role in Southeast Asia from the South China Sea to the Mekong Region - the latter within the framework of China-supported Lancang Mekong Cooperation - also may reshape regional dynamics, while China's bilateral relationships with most Southeast Asian countries have been strengthened while ASEAN's role, unity and centrality have become more problematic. As the smaller regional states grapple with ongoing changes on the ground and in the sea, other major powers beside China are on the move in their own different ways. Southeast Asia is a region clearly in flux, a consequential nexus and arena for contest and cooperation. What happens in Southeast Asia will be portentous for what will happen on the broader global canvass. This public forum brings together top experts on the subject of China's rise, dynamism, and strategic aims and intentions. We will start with Mr Jim Stent’s presentation based on his new book, China’s Banking Transformation: The Untold Story, as a way of launching into a more encompassing discussion on China, Southeast Asia, and broader geoeconomics and geopolitics. 
More>>

Public Forum: Myanmar's Rohingya/Rakhine Crisis: Domestic Roots and International Dynamics - (Youtube and Summary Report) 

As we are aware, Myanmar's promising reforms from 2011 culminated with elections four years later and a power-sharing agreement between generals and civilians, the latter led by Aung San Suu Kyi. Economic development has risen markedly, albeit from a low base, but fatigue and disillusion have beset democratization under high expectations. Due to the Suu Kyi-led government’s own fault and to intractable ethnic unrest, Myanmar has become a single-issue country revolving around the persecution of the Rohingya Muslim minority in westernmost Rakhine state. Myanmar’s economy is poised to enjoy a prolonged expansion as more capital and labor are deployed on fertile land but the country's democratic politics will be messy and unsatisfactory, leaving its erstwhile supporters in the international community feeling jilted. Against this backdrop, our public forum on this occasion will examine the trends and dynamics of Myanmar's Rohingya/Rakhine crisis. 
More>>
 Articles

(October 19, 2018) Debunking two myths of the 2014 coup - Thitinan Pongsudhirak 

As momentum towards the next general election gathers pace, the two main myths that underpinned Thailand's most recent military coup in May 2014 deserve debunking. Both are associated with the military's role in politics. Seeing through these two perpetuated myths leaves us with the reality that all players in Thai politics are in pursuit of power and vested interests. All pretence to the contrary is sheer falsehood, hypocrisy and political manipulation. 
More>>

(October 16, 2018) Vietnam's star rises, as does one of its leaders - Kavi Chongkittavorn 

At the outset, three important characteristics of Vietnam must be recognised.

First, despite its economy not yet being considered a market economy, Vietnam has the region's most extensive network of free trade agreements with foreign countries. Its economic growth continues at an average of 7%. It is the economic powerhouse of Asean. 
More>>

(October 12, 2018) The annals of Thailand's military dictators - Thitinan Pongsudhirak 

As Gen Prayut Chan-o-cha eyes longer-term power beyond the next election, his eventual legacy will be compared to other military leaders who have come and gone as heads of past Thai governments. Had he left office or stepped down to run for it earlier, Gen Prayut might be in a better place. As things stand, his tenure and subsequent exit from the political scene does not appear promising for how he will be seen in hindsight.

Once they seize the reins of government, military dictators in contemporary Thailand generally do not leave voluntarily. Most often, they are forced out by internal factionalism and power plays within the army high command, based on this or that cohort of officers and competing groups of loyalists. This was the case with Field Marshal Plaek Phibulsonggram in 1957. After ruling for a decade and overseeing two competing cliques in the army that also involved the police force on one side, Phibul lost political control and was ousted in a military coup. 
More>>

(October 9, 2018) Malaysia's new dynamic in the deep South - Kavi Chongkittavorn 

Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad is coming to Thailand later this month to try and tamp down the festering violence in southern Thailand. As his return to power in May has rejuvenated his country's openness and democratisation, he offers a ray of hope to Thailand's future peace and stability. 
More>>

(October 5, 2018) Thailand's new military and new politics - Thitinan Pongsudhirak 

Most likely not in accordance with his preference, Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha is finding out that the military high command he seized power with during the May 2014 coup will be fundamentally different when he leaves office. 
More>>

(October 4, 2018) Thailand and Myanmar are natural allies - Kavi Chongkittavorn 

At their 9th annual joint bilateral meeting in Nay Pyi Taw in August, both countries proclaimed from now on they are "natural strategic partners". It was the right time, coming on the 70th anniversary of diplomatic relations being established. The new status is unique as it highlights and recognises the strategic value of their shared traditions, culture, religion and way of life. 
More>>

(Septermber 28, 2018) China's Belt & Road impact on Thailand - Thitinan Pongsudhirak 

As China's ambitious Silk Road Economic Belt (SREB) and Maritime Silk Road (MSR) -- popularly known as the Belt and Road Initiative, or BRI -- continues to make ripples and waves in international affairs, its likely impact on mainland Southeast Asia warrants attention. Unlike many of the countries on the Eurasian landmass and along waterways from the South China Sea through the Indian Ocean to eastern Africa, Thailand and its immediate neighbours are not directly on the BRI path. 
More>>

(September 25, 2018) US, EU must tread carefully over Cambodia - Kavi Chongkittavorn 

The US and EU must not commit the same mistakes in Cambodia that they made in Thailand. Efforts to pressure strongman Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen to follow their suggested paths will not work. Worse still, they could have serious adverse effects, as the country's domestic and external conditions are very different and unique. 
More>>

(September 21, 2018) Remembering Chai-anan Samudavanija - Thitinan Pongsudhirak 

In death, as in life, Chai-anan Samudavanija always outshines. More than two decades after he left an academic career for policy work and a public intellectual role, Chai-anan's scholarly output is still cited more than any other social scientist. His passing, at 74, reflects Thailand's circuitous political trajectory and the shortcomings of the country's higher education. Until Thai academic standards are better incentivised and upgraded, few scholars are likely to scale international heights of scholarship and thought leadership anywhere near Chai-anan's achievements 
More>>

(September 18, 2018) Is Huai Khwang really a new Chinatown? - Kavi Chongkittavorn 

Bluntly speaking, Huai Khwang, which has been dubbed a new Chinatown, is not really a Chinatown in the truest sense of the word -- not another Yaowarat for sure. The 400-metre strip along Pracha Rat Bamphen Road at best represents the dynamic and raw passion of new Chinese entrepreneurs, wanting to make money from millions of Chinese tourists through social media. New Chinese restaurants with dishes from Yunnan and Guangxi, especially the spicy mala hotpot as well as Chinese-style coffee shops, give this small business district the facade of a Chinatown. 
More>>

POWERED BY CHAIYO READY WEB
LEADER IN READY TEMPLATE SERVICE